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True Mastery Lies In Limitation

June 5, 2017

Choose a nice spot. It can be anywhere.


Perhaps you’re feeling poetic and you go to the park, sit by a pond, and meditate —the combined sounds of birds, eager dogs, and passersby helping you to connect to the practice.
Perhaps you’re feeling private instead, and prefer the quietness and comfort of your own mat, in your own bedroom, in your own place. Never underestimate the value of a ‘room of your own’ when it comes to spending time with/by yourself.


Then again, perhaps you’re feeling social and prefer the atmosphere of a group of people that come together to practice at the same time, in the same place. There is certainly something to the fabric of a collective that’s made out of the synchronized rhythms of different individualities voluntarily choosing to share one moment in time and space.


Whatever works for you, do it. It cannot be overemphasized: You have to learn to listen to yourself, and commit to whatever practice you choose to follow. Continuity is key.

 

 

A lot about yoga is, in fact, this simple. One could even go as far as to say that ‘simplicity’ is, per se, the key founding principle of this practice; because yoga teaches you to learn to be present first and foremost in/with yourself —a seemingly ‘simple’ idea that is fundamentally complex.

 

In a world saturated with the principles of ‘doing, having, and being more’ it sometimes seems counterintuitive to aim for less, to strip yourself bare of all excess luggage and devote some minutes every day to learning to just make do with ‘being, doing, and/or having’ less. There is however a great deal of ‘pluses’ in trying this exercise in humility. It is just like in the picture featured below this text.

 

To have a solid foundation, one that may allow you to build on it future improved versions of yourself, you have to learn to master simple tasks first. In the case of this Vrikshasana, or Tree Pose, this basically translates into learning to stand still in moments of happiness and unrest, in the face of turmoil and calmness; it means learning to breath in and out properly to really connect with, and harness, the bulk of your energies and emotions as they traverse in and out and up and down your body; and more than any other thing, it means learning to do all of this in one single moment of synchronized ‘simplicity.’

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